Do I Have Drug Use Problems?

You may be wondering if you or someone you know is struggling with a drug use disorder. There are certain warning signs of a drug use problem, and although they will vary depending on the person, the substance, the amount used, and the duration of use, it is highly likely that at least one of the following symptoms will be present. Please note that the following signs and symptoms of a substance abuse disorder is not a comprehensive list, and is not to be used in place of a professional diagnosis. Please see a doctor or find a treatment center near you if you have any of the following symptoms:   Continuing drug use after it is no longer needed to treat a mental or physical health problem.
  • Increased tolerance to the substance.
  • Withdrawal symptoms when not using the drug, such as sweating, hot/cold flashes, nausea, headaches, fatigue, depression, anxiety, appetite changes, sleep problems, and digestive issues. Severe withdrawals can cause hallucinations and fever.
  • Unsuccessful attempts to cut back or abstain from the substance.
  • Continuing to use the substance despite it causing problems with work or relationships.
  • Spending a lot of time and energy thinking about, obtaining, and using the drug.
  • Loss of interest in former hobbies or relationships.
  • Trouble keeping up with normal daily activities, such as hygiene, cooking, and working.
  • Using the substance at inappropriate or risky times, such as while driving or caring for children.
  • Borrowing or stealing money for the drugs, or because you have run out of money for basic necessities because of drugs.
  • Hiding your drug use from others.
  • Problems with relationships, friendships, and co-workers caused by drug use or the personality changes that go along with drug use.
  • Oversleeping or insomnia, or any major change in sleeping habits.
  • Overeating or under-eating, or any major change in eating habits.
  • Seeing multiple doctors for the same prescription, or lying to doctors to get more of a prescription.
  • Going through medicine cabinets in other people‚Äôs homes looking for drugs.
  • Having a specific friend or group that you do drugs with or get drugs from.
  • Combining medications to get high, or mixing drugs and alcohol.
  • Bloodshot eyes, nosebleeds, wounds or lesions on the face and arms from picking, bruises and needle marks on the inner arms or other points of injection.
  • Personality and behavior changes, such as irritability, anxiety, and aggression.